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Early intervention

What is the Importance of EARLY INTERVENTION?

Research shows that early diagnosis of and interventions for autism are more likely to have major long-term positive effects on symptoms and later skills. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can sometimes be diagnosed in children before they are 2 years of age.

Some children with ASD whose development seems typical up to that point begin to regress just before or sometime around 2 years old.

Early intervention can occur at or before preschool age, as early as 2 or 3 years of age. In this period, a young child's brain is still forming, meaning it is more "plastic" or malleable than at older ages. Because of this plasticity, treatments have a better chance of being effective in the longer term.

Early intervention not only give children the best start possible, but also the best chance of developing to their fullest potential.

The sooner a child gets help, the greater the chance for learning and progress. In fact, recent guidelines suggest starting an integrated developmental and behavioral intervention as soon as ASD is diagnosed or seriously suspected.

With early intervention, some children with autism make so much progress that they are no longer on the autism spectrum when they are older.

What is the Importance of EARLY INTERVENTION?

Research shows that early diagnosis of and interventions for autism are more likely to have major long-term positive effects on symptoms and later skills. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can sometimes be diagnosed in children before they are 2 years of age.

Some children with ASD whose development seems typical up to that point begin to regress just before or sometime around 2 years old.

Early intervention can occur at or before preschool age, as early as 2 or 3 years of age. In this period, a young child's brain is still forming, meaning it is more "plastic" or malleable than at older ages. Because of this plasticity, treatments have a better chance of being effective in the longer term.

Early intervention not only give children the best start possible, but also the best chance of developing to their fullest potential.

The sooner a child gets help, the greater the chance for learning and progress. In fact, recent guidelines suggest starting an integrated developmental and behavioral intervention as soon as ASD is diagnosed or seriously suspected.

With early intervention, some children with autism make so much progress that they are no longer on the autism spectrum when they are older.

First 100 Days: 4 years and under

When you have an autism diagnosis for the first time, the first 100 days can be trying. Many questions, thoughts, feelings may start running through your mind and you’re unsure of where to even begin. You may feel overwhelmed and unsure what the next steps may be. Behavioral Health Works is happy to share an awesome resource provided by Autism Speaks where they provided a helping hand especially for this 100 day transition period.

Autism Speaks provides families with many free resources and the 100 day kit is just one of them! This kit is aimed to help families affected by autism have a basic understanding on what autism is, what to expect, who to reach out to and many other useful tools.

First 100 Days: 4 years and under

When you have an autism diagnosis for the first time, the first 100 days can be trying. Many questions, thoughts, feelings may start running through your mind and you’re unsure of where to even begin. You may feel overwhelmed and unsure what the next steps may be. Behavioral Health Works is happy to share an awesome resource provided by Autism Speaks where they provided a helping hand especially for this 100 day transition period.

Autism Speaks provides families with many free resources and the 100 day kit is just one of them! This kit is aimed to help families affected by autism have a basic understanding on what autism is, what to expect, who to reach out to and many other useful tools.

First 100 Days: 5-13 years

Our environments are full of sensory information, including noise, crowds, light, clothing, temperature and so on. We process this information using our senses – sight, hearing, touch, smell and taste.

Autistic children are sometimes oversensitive or undersensitive to sensory information. This means their senses take in either too much or too little information from the environment around them. Not all autistic children have sensory sensitivities, but some might have several.

First 100 Days: 5-13 years

Our environments are full of sensory information, including noise, crowds, light, clothing, temperature and so on. We process this information using our senses – sight, hearing, touch, smell and taste.

Autistic children are sometimes oversensitive or undersensitive to sensory information. This means their senses take in either too much or too little information from the environment around them. Not all autistic children have sensory sensitivities, but some might have several.

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**Experienced Autism Alliance (“EAA”) does not endorse any specific treatments or therapies. Information provided is not meant to serve as medical advice. EAA urges individuals exploring any treatment to work with their treating physician to make the best decisions for their own care. 

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